NYVIC (New Yorkers for Vaccination Information and Choice)

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Understanding Infection - Not a Battle, but a Housecleaning 
by Philip Incao, M.D.

Listen to Patrick Timpone's 38 minute, KLBJ-Austin interview of Dr. Philip Incao. *

Dr. Incao's Background
Dr. Incao, who has been studying vaccinations and the immune system for almost 30 years, explains why it is important for children to experience inflammations (fever) and other viral and bacterial infections so as to build the immune system.. 

His article on vaccinations and the immune system, "Supporting Children's Health" in the September 1997 issue of Alternative Medicine Digest generated much interest and was reprinted both in Canada and in Australia. In it, Dr. Incao writes:

One of the best ways to ensure your children's health is to allow them to get sick. At first hearing, this concept may sound outrageous. Yet standard childhood illnesses, such as measles, mumps, and even whooping cough, may be of key benefit to a child's developing immune system and it may be inadvisable to suppress these illnesses with immunizations. Evidence is also accumulating that routine childhood vaccinations may directly contribute to the emergence of chronic problems such as eczema, ear infections, asthma, and bowel inflammations.

Dr. Incao's website 
 


* Open the timpone-incao.mp3 file and listen online or save to your hard drive and play later. Listening may require installation of software, such as (free) WinAmp, if you don't already have a player installed. The 13mb file will require patience to download if you have a slow connection.

 
 

       
  

What is the future of our Vaccination Decisions Support Group? Answers, (such as they are) will be posted here.

Audio and Video Vaccination Related Links

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